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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

7 edition of Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject found in the catalog.

Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject

by Eleanor Curran

  • 35 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Renaissance & Humanist philosophy,
  • Philosophy,
  • Political,
  • Philosophy / Political,
  • Human rights,
  • Monarchy,
  • Philsoophy,
  • Political science

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10193707M
    ISBN 100230001491
    ISBN 109780230001497

    it the assumption that for Hobbes, this kind of right is a good thing to have. I would not want to argue with the view that rights held under the right of nature exemplify what a right is for Hobbes but I do want to question whether holding a right of this kind is, in Hobbes’s view, a good thing.   The authors have created a sort of anti-Book of Virtues in this encyclopedic compendium of the ways and means of power. Everyone wants power and everyone is in a constant duplicitous game to gain more power at the expense of others, according to Greene, a screenwriter and former editor at Esquire (Elffers, a book packager, designed the volume, with its attractive marginalia).

      Curran, Eleanor, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject, New York / Basingstoke, Palgrave / Macmillan, Gross, Daniel M., Th e Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle’s Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science, paperback edition, Chicago / London, Th e University of Chicago Press, []. Thomas Hobbes - Thomas Hobbes - Political philosophy: Hobbes presented his political philosophy in different forms for different audiences. De Cive states his theory in what he regarded as its most scientific form. Unlike The Elements of Law, which was composed in English for English parliamentarians—and which was written with local political challenges to Charles I in mind—De Cive was a.

    That is, the subject is an author of the sovereign's power and is accordingly responsible for the sovereign's actions. So even if the sovereign imprisons or kills the subject, the subject has been personally responsible for his own fate. Hobbes concludes that freedom can only truly exist under a sovereign power authorized by its subjects. Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject By: Susanne Sreedhar Pages: 99–


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Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject by Eleanor Curran Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject [Curran, Eleanor] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian SubjectCited by: Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject book.

'There are no substantive rights for subjects in Hobbes's political theory, only bare freedoms without correlated duties to protect them'.

Curran challenges this orthodoxy of Hobbes scholarship, and argues that Hobbes's theory is not a theory of natural rights but rather, a modern, secular theoryBrand: Palgrave Macmillan UK. Get this from a library. Reclaiming the rights of the Hobbesian subject. [Eleanor Curran] -- "In this book, Eleanor Curran seeks to reveal Hobbes's contribution to the theory of individual rights and to the history of the concept of individual rights.

Beginning by examining Hobbes's. Get this from a library. Reclaiming the rights of the Hobbesian subject. [Eleanor Curran] -- In this groundbreaking book, Curran seeks to reveal Hobbes's contribution to the theory of individual rights and to the history of the concept of individual rights.

Beginning by examining Hobbes's. 'There are no substantive rights for subjects in Hobbes's political theory, only bare freedoms without correlated duties to protect them'. Curran challenges this orthodoxy of Hobbes scholarship, and argues that Hobbes's theory is not a theory of natural rights but rather, a modern, secular theory of rights, with relevance to modern rights theory.

Book Reviews / Hobbes Studies 21 () 93– 99 Eleanor Curran, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject, Palgrave / Macmillan,pp., ISBN (hardback). Eleanor Curran’s new book, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject, is a fresh look at a subject that is widely taken to have been ‘resolved’ in Hobbes scholarship: Hobbes’s view of rights.

Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject Right, without hindrance from him; not without hindrance from another. So that the effect which redoundeth to one man, by another mans defect of Right, is but so much diminution of impediments to the use of his own Right originall.

Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject. By Eleanor Curran. Abstract. In this ground breaking book Curran seeks to reveal Hobbes’ contribution to the theory of individual rights and to the history of the concept of individual rights. Beginning by examining Hobbes’s pronouncements on rights in the context of the writing of his Author: Eleanor Curran.

Book Review in Hobbes Studies 21 () 93– 99 Eleanor Curran, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject (Palgrave / Macmillan, ) Eleanor Curran’s new book, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject, is a fresh look at a subject that is widely taken to have been ‘resolved’ in Hobbes scholarship: Hobbes’s view of rights.

Given Hobbes’s initial description of rights held under the right of nature and the process by which individuals come to transfer invasive rights to each other and take on duties, one could see this as an indication that the rights are under the control of the right-holder.

Hobbes certainly says that this is a voluntary process. Similar books and articles. Hobbes's Theory of Rights. Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject. (31) A Hohfeldian Analysis of Hobbesian Rights. Arthur Yates - - Law and Philosophy 32 (4) Submission and Subjection in Leviathan: Good Subjects in the Hobbesian.

The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, Kant and Marx.

Similar books and articles. A Hohfeldian Analysis of Hobbesian Rights. Arthur Yates - - Law and Philosophy 32 (4) Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject. Eleanor Curran - Review of Eleanor Curran’s Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Sovereign.

[REVIEW] Susanne Sreedhar - - Hobbes Studies 21 (1) Two notable exceptions are Claire Finkelstein, "A Puzzle About Hobbes's Right of Self-Defense," Pacific Philosophical Quarterly (): ; and Eleanor Curran, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject (Houndsmills: Palgrave Macmillan, ).

Both Finkelstein and Curran take themselves to be defending Hobbes on this issue. Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject. Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan Publishers.

In this ground breaking book Curran seeks to reveal Hobbes’ contribution to the theory of individual rights and to the history of the concept of individual rights.

Beginning by examining Hobbes’s pronouncements on rights in the context of the. A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

Her book will appeal to all who are interested in the nature and limits of political authority, the right of self-defense, the right of revolution, and the modern origins of these issues.

Reviews ‘This is an excellent book on centrally important - but often neglected - aspects of Hobbes. Download Citation | Leviathan No More: The Right of Nature and the Limits of Sovereignty in Hobbes | This article challenges the prevailing interpretations of Hobbes's thought as providing only.

Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Commonwealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil, commonly referred to as Leviathan, is a book written by Thomas Hobbes (–) and published in (revised Latin edition ).

Its name derives from the biblical work concerns the structure of society and legitimate government, and is regarded as one of the earliest and most influential.

Accept. We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies. The essays in this volume offer an approach to the history of moral and political philosophy that takes its inspiration from John Rawls.

The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, Kant.

So that in the right Definition of Names, lyes the first use of Speech; which is the Acquisition of Science: And in wrong, or no Definitions' lyes the first abuse; from which proceed all false and senslesse Tenets; which make those men that take their instruction from the authority of books, and not from their own meditation, to be as much.The essays in this volume offer an approach to the history of moral and political philosophy that takes its inspiration from John Rawls.

The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, and Price: $